Who is Byron Eksteen?

Some call him dark, others call him an abstract realist

Byron Eksteen paints dreamscapes, other realms and third dimensions. His vivid art isn't restricted to a particular time or location and the experience is something unique to each individual. Some don't understand him, some say that he is dark, some see themselves in his work and others would call him an abstract realist. Perhaps he is simply a young man who can see the beauty in all aspects of life, where others may not.

CTMag: Who are you?

Byron: "I speak a language of emotion through my art. This means that I have the potential to grab a person out of their reality and inspire them."

CTMag: What have you achieved?

Byron: "I have had a series of commissions from Mr Pickwicks on Long Street to paint replicas of 1930s lesbian artist Tamara and I will be exhibiting at the District Six Museum in February."

CTMag: Tell us about your background.

Byron: "I grew up close to my god father's game reserve in Johannesburg. The bush was a beautiful, mystical and inspiring space and I still remember the smells and sounds vividly. I wish I still had the first drawings I penned there when I was four."

CTMag: Do you feel you made a wise career decision?

Byron: "I was discouraged by family and friends but I have stayed true to my own heart. I'm motivated by the fact that I can inspire people and give them some insight. Sometimes I do slip up, I'm only human."

CTMag: How would you describe your style?

Byron: "I've been described as an abstract realist as I enjoy painting dreams, as well as other realms and dimensions. My current work was written to music at Madame Zingara and reflects the way that musicians were speaking to each other."

CTMag: What moves you?

Byron: "This world. This life. Everyone has a different view on life and God, which I find fascinating. A lot of people just don't see that there is beauty in everything. I recently saw a photograph of a girl snorkelling right next to a whale which I found truly inspirational."

CTMag: How do you express your emotions through art?

Byron: "Through shape, line work and colour. While I was watching the musicians at Tagore in Observatory I could’ve connected  a blue pen resting on my table with the way that their music is speaking to me. Blue means peace, positivity and spontaneity."

CTMag: What techniques do you use?

Byron: "I feel most comfortable with oils, but I'm open to experiment."

CTMag: How is your work interpreted by other people?

Byron: "Some people say that my work is dark, whereas others interpret it differently. Some people see either themselves or those close to them in my art. I was commissioned to paint two abstract works based on photographs and descriptions of a woman's two sisters. Although I didn't tell her which painting was attributed to each sister, she was able to differentiate between them."

CTMag: What can people expect from you in the future?

Byron: "I plan to work on a much bigger scale using 3m by 3m boards and full colour. I will also continue to paint with music."

For more information, contact Byron Eksteen on +27 (0)82 552 7803

By Lisa Nevitt

For inspiring art, theatre and museums, be sure to visit our Arts & Culture Section.

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